Kathryn_Hunt

Poets in Conversation: Alice Derry and Kathryn Hunt

Alice Derry invited me to read with her on July 26 at Northwind Arts Center Reading Series, in Port Townsend, at 7 p.m. We’ll be celebrating the publication of Alice’s fifth book of poems, Hunger.

I count Alice Derry as a friend and I’m grateful to her for having asked me to join her. Alice’s poetry is insightful, rich in revelation and honesty and the precious metals of real labor; always searching; and marked by fierce and intimate observation of the world around her, that is to say, of the people and places that have laid claim to her heart.

Alice Derry’s website alicederry.com

This is what Alice wrote about her new book Hunger and her earlier work:

Hunger, my fifth volume of poems, will appear from MoonPath Press of Tillamook, Oregon, in 2018. The book began as a response to the physical hunger which was a constant in my childhood, but the poems quickly grew beyond that narrow scope to address hungers of all kinds, especially the metaphorical hunger of longing as expressed in “The Extravagance of Our Longing,” the title of section three and of one of the poems in the section.

The book contains five parts. It has a feminist edge, the second section titled “Stealing from Young Women,” how various hungers in the world take from the lives of others and from the innocent, especially women. Section three contains poems I wrote after a family trip to Greece in 2007. I have marketed that section as a chapbook; it was twice a finalist in contests. Sections four and five address the many hungers of my childhood and my life as a mother, which continues in a different form now that my child is thirty with her own child. Social justice has always been a part of my writing; several poems in the manuscript pay attention to events in various tribal histories, seen from a personal point of view. My father took us kids to many reservations throughout the West when I was young. Physical hunger always accompanied these trips.

Lucille Clifton writes this about hunger:

 

and if I could name this

in a frenzy of understanding

it would be called hunger

that sits in a woman’s spaces

 

The book finds its life in the spaces Clifton evokes.

Molly Gloss writes of Hunger:

Alice Derry’s Hunger is so beautiful, so dense with layers of meaning and the weight of the unspoken, so rich in its language and rhythm, that the book as a whole just frankly left me breathless. These are poems of enraged tenderness, of estrangement, of questioning and seeking, poems of family and childhood, poems of loss and yearning and sustenance—poems exploring every nuance of what we mean by hunger. I could hear in them, see in them, voices and shadows from my own life– “Words leave their source/ and in their new landscape, speak differently.”  I savored every poem, and I know I will be returning to this book again and again, peeling back the layers.

A short bio

Hunger is Alice Derry’s fifth volume of poetry (MoonPath Press, 2018). Tremolo was published by Red Hen Press in 2012. As manuscript, it received a 2011 Washington Artist Trust Award. Strangers To Their Courage, from Louisiana State University Press, 2001, was a finalist for the Washington Book Award. With Tess Gallagher and others, Derry helped stage a month-long 75th birthday celebration for Raymond Carver in 2013, delivering the event’s keynote address. Derry has two previous collections, Stages of Twilight (1986, chosen by Raymond Carver) and Clearwater (1997, Blue Begonia Press). A chapbook of translations from Rainer Rilke appeared in 2002. Derry taught English and German at Peninsula College in Port Angeles, Washington, for twenty-nine years, where she co-directed the Foothills Writers’ Series. In 2017 she was Writer-in-Residence at Peninsula College.

Alice Derry’s website alicederry.com

 

 

 

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Poets in Conversation: Alice Derry and Kathryn Hunt

Alice Derry invited me to read with her on May 9, 2018 at the Jefferson County Library at 6:30 p.m., as part of the library’s Poets in Conversation series. We’ll be celebrating the publication of Alice’s fifth book of poems, Hunger. 

I count Alice Derry as a friend and I’m grateful to her for having asked me to join her. Alice’s poetry is insightful, rich in revelation and honesty and the precious metals of real labor; always searching; and marked by fierce and intimate observation of the world around her, that is to say, of the people and places that have laid claim to her heart.

If you miss us on May 9, we’ll read together again on July 26 at Northwind Arts Center Reading Series, in Port Townsend, at 7 p.m.

Alice Derry’s website alicederry.com

This is what Alice wrote about her new book Hunger and her earlier work:

Hunger, my fifth volume of poems, will appear from MoonPath Press of Tillamook, Oregon, in 2018. The book began as a response to the physical hunger which was a constant in my childhood, but the poems quickly grew beyond that narrow scope to address hungers of all kinds, especially the metaphorical hunger of longing as expressed in “The Extravagance of Our Longing,” the title of section three and of one of the poems in the section.

The book contains five parts. It has a feminist edge, the second section titled “Stealing from Young Women,” how various hungers in the world take from the lives of others and from the innocent, especially women. Section three contains poems I wrote after a family trip to Greece in 2007. I have marketed that section as a chapbook; it was twice a finalist in contests. Sections four and five address the many hungers of my childhood and my life as a mother, which continues in a different form now that my child is thirty with her own child. Social justice has always been a part of my writing; several poems in the manuscript pay attention to events in various tribal histories, seen from a personal point of view. My father took us kids to many reservations throughout the West when I was young. Physical hunger always accompanied these trips.

Lucille Clifton writes this about “hunger”:

and if I could name this

in a frenzy of understanding

it would be called hunger

that sits in a woman’s spaces

The book finds its life in the spaces Clifton evokes.

Molly Gloss writes of Hunger:

Alice Derry’s Hunger is so beautiful, so dense with layers of meaning and the weight of the unspoken, so rich in its language and rhythm, that the book as a whole just frankly left me breathless. These are poems of enraged tenderness, of estrangement, of questioning and seeking, poems of family and childhood, poems of loss and yearning and sustenance—poems exploring every nuance of what we mean by hunger. I could hear in them, see in them, voices and shadows from my own life– “Words leave their source/ and in their new landscape, speak differently.”  I savored every poem, and I know I will be returning to this book again and again, peeling back the layers.

A short bio

Hunger is Alice Derry’s fifth volume of poetry (MoonPath Press, 2018). Tremolo was published by Red Hen Press in 2012. As manuscript, it received a 2011 Washington Artist Trust Award. Strangers To Their Courage, from Louisiana State University Press, 2001, was a finalist for the Washington Book Award. With Tess Gallagher and others, Derry helped stage a month-long 75th birthday celebration for Raymond Carver in 2013, delivering the event’s keynote address. Derry has two previous collections, Stages of Twilight (1986, chosen by Raymond Carver) and Clearwater (1997, Blue Begonia Press). A chapbook of translations from Rainer Rilke appeared in 2002. Derry taught English and German at Peninsula College in Port Angeles, Washington, for twenty-nine years, where she co-directed the Foothills Writers’ Series. In 2017 she was Writer-in-Residence at Peninsula College.

Alice Derry’s website alicederry.com

 

 

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The Art & Craft of Memoir – October 10 – November 14

The Art & Craft of Memoir – October 10 – November 14

The Art and Craft of Memoir
Wednesdays, 2:30 – 5 pm
October 10 – November 14
Writers’ Workshoppe  |  Imprint Books
Port Townsend, Washington
$150
6 sessions | 6 participants max

Bring your work-in-progress to this weekly workshop and receive thoughtful responses and encouragement to write on. We’ll combine discussion of the art and craft of memoir, consider work by masters of the genre, and offer each other helpful ideas that foster excellence in the work and a sense of community among participants. Whether you’re writing a short piece or a full-length manuscript, this workshop will help you discover that sweet spot between writing, research, and revision. We’ll work on building scenes and learn to move back and forth in time and awareness, as your narrator’s understanding grows and changes. Each week we’ll read your work aloud and discuss it, offering constructive responses intended to help you hone and revise your story. Comments are best received in a safe and supportive atmosphere; we’ll talk about the framework we’ll use at our first meeting.

Kathryn Hunt makes her home on the coast of the Salish Sea. Her poems have appeared in The Sun, Orion, Rattle, Radar, The Writer’s Almanac, The Missouri Review, and Narrative. Her collection of poems, Long Way Through Ruin, was published by Blue Begonia Press, and she’s recently completed a second collection of poems, You Won’t Find It on a Map. She is the recipient of residencies and awards from Artists Trust, Ucross, and Hedgebrook. kathrynhunt.net

Register |  Writers’ Workshoppe | 360.379.2617

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Unamuno Author Series 2018 | Madrid, Spain

Unamuno Author Series 2018 | Madrid, Spain

March 23
Poetry reading |
Unamuno Author Series 2018 | Madrid, Spain

Desperate Literature bookstore
C. Campomanes 13
Madrid, Spain
Sponsor | Catedral del Redentor
Founder | Rvdo. Spencer Reece

George and Spencer in Madrid 2017

From the Poetry Foundation, about dear darling Spencer Reece, poet and founder of the Unamuno Author Series in Madrid:

Born in Hartford, Connecticut, and raised in Minneapolis, poet Spencer Reece is the son of a pathologist and a nurse. He earned a BA at Wesleyan University, an MA at the University of York, an MTS at Harvard Divinity School, and an MDiv at Yale Divinity School. He was ordained in the Episcopal Church in 2011. Reece’s debut collection of poetry, The Clerk’s Tale(2004), was chosen for the Bakeless Poetry Prize by Louise Glück and adapted into a short film by director James Franco. He is also the author of the collection The Road to Emmaus (2013), which was a longlist nominee for the National Book Award.

Reece’s poems explore faith and family, paying attention to the fragility of each. Though he wrote in relative isolation for two decades before his first book was published, Reece received early encouragement from writer Annie Dillard and poet James Merrill. In a statement for the Poetry Society of America, Reece discussed the inspirational role T.S. Eliot has played in his work: “I often ponder Eliot’s spiritual journey,” Reece noted. “When I try to write, his example is never far from my mind. At times, I’d like to think I am in conversation with him.” Reece’s own work has been compared to that of Gerard Manley Hopkins, particularly by poet Henri Cole, who observed that Reece “is a formal poet, but his form is not bloodlessly perfect. He is unafraid of smudging things to get us closer to the truth.”

His honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, grants from the Fulbright Foundation and the Minnesota State Arts Council, a Witter Bynner fellowship from the Library of Congress, the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship, and a Whiting Writers’ Award.

Chaplain to Bishop Carlos Lopez-Lozano of the Reformed Episcopal Church in Spain, Reece was awarded a Fulbright grant to work on a collaborative writing project with children at an orphanage in Honduras in 2012-2013.

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